Trail Patrol Home

  Backcountry Trail Patrol

  A non-profit organization dedicated to protecting trail users and forest resources through service and backcountry safety education.

Home

News

Trail Patrol

    New Patroller Training

Winter Patrol

Trails:

   Chippewa Nat'l. Forest

   Superior Nat'l. Forest

MTB Search & Rescue

Medical Training

Minimum Impact

Partners 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrol Pages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Patrol Training

New Backcountry/NMBP Patroller Training: May 21 and 22, 2016, Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival Office, Cable, WI

2016 NMBP Training

New National Mountain Bike Patroller Training for the Backcountry Trail Patrol this year will be May 21-22, 2016, at the Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival office, on Spruce St. in Cable, WI. Free camping  Friday and Saturday nights at the USFS Namakagon Campground, 3 miles north of the Town Hall on C. Rd. "D".

In the past, we have attracted new members through our annual Wilderness First Aid and bi-annual Wilderness First Responder (WFR) classes, held each winter/spring. In attempt to “raise the bar” above NMBP’s basic national standards, effective January 1, 2014 we require all prospective members to complete a 24 hour Wilderness First Aid (WFA) and CPR training course from us or another provider who follows Wilderness Medical Society Scope of Practice guidelines, We hold our 24-hour Wilderness Emergency Medical Care (Essentially WFA plus several skill areas directly related to our activities and climate.) course in March or April each year, near Zimmerman. We no longer be offering WFR training, but strongly encourage members to take that training, either through other providers, or by taking Outdoor Emergency Care training through the National Ski Patrol.

We hold our training near our primary patrol venue, the CAMBA trails in NW Wisconsin. After training, you would then need to join NMBP through the IMBA website, and take and pass their on-line certification exam to become an active patrol member. Then for the first six months, you will patrol with an experienced patroller on the trails as well as at events. We ask that all members commit to doing at least 12 hours of trail patrol on CAMBA and/or MORC trails per season, and work at least three events over the course of a year.

For more information on training, e-mail Backcountry@nospamtrailpatrol.org (Remove the "nospam" for emailing us.) for more information.

 

Personal Equipment 
Personal safety is an important part of Backcountry Trail Patrol training.  Probationary members learn what equipment they can and should carry with them, and how to be prepared for the rapidly changing conditions in the North Woods. The link above will take you our suggested equipment page.

Land Navigation  
Patrollers learn how to use a map, compass and GPS and how to effectively help when other trail users need directions.

Minimum Impact Travel
An important aspect of patrol responsibilities is to teach all trail users, and mountain bikers in particular, how to enjoy the environment without damaging it.

Emergency Procedures
Occasionally forest visitors will get hurt, or become lost. Patrol members learn basic search and rescue procedures to help locate them quickly and effectively.

Communications
The Patrol teaches new members how to use U.S. Forest Service, DNR and Backcountry Patrol radios and how to communicate with Forest Officers and other patrollers. They also learn inter-personal communication skills for assisting other trail users, and avoiding confrontations.

Trail Maintenance
The Backcountry Trail Patrol performs light trail maintenance, including re-marking established trails and, when possible, removing obstructions. Situations beyond our capabilities are reported to the District Ranger's office for action.

First Aid and CPR
All Patrol members are required to have a minimum of 16 hours of Wilderness First Aid training and CPR certification.

Scenario-Based Training
After a candidate learns the basics, they spend time on National and State Forest trails with a mentor, to practice what they have learned. New patrollers learn to react to typical conditions they will encounter when dealing with trail users.